Newsletter Extra

November 05 Newsletter

Giving Thanks

 

As November rolls through, I can recall the childhood days of raking leaves before the season's first snow back in New Hampshire. But as the aroma of Jamie's amazing turkey mixes with the fragrances of our tropical garden that surrounds the house, I realize that I am so thankful that we live where we do. So in honor of Thanksgiving, we would like to give thanks to the "Aina" (the land) for providing such beautiful scenery and inspiration.
This movie is a tribute to the spirit of this island both above and below the water.
It is well worth the download.

Click here to watch video (high speed connection)

Click here to watch video (slower speed connections)


Click here to download CDrom movie (14.6mb)

 

Creature Feature

Hawaiian "Turkeyfish" or Lionfish

Hawaiian name nohu pinau
There was never a doubt what creature to feature this month.
The elusive "Turkeyfish" is always a highlight on a dive. Their colorful fins fan out as they cruise around. Along with containing venomous spines, the fins are used to help corner or corral potential prey, usually small fish, crabs and shrimp. Be cautious if diving in caverns, the Turkeyfish is often found swimming on the ceiling.
They are one of the most popular subjects for photography and I think you will see why in this video. I just wish I could get them to swim towards the camera more often. They are quite the elusive little fish!!
Text Material reference: Hawaii's Fishes by John Hoover (http://www.hawaiisfishes.com/)

Click here to watch video (high speed connection)

Click here to watch video (slower speed connections)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dive Site of the month

The Mahi

 

Dive Site: The Mahi
Depth: 40-95 ft (30m)
Location: Oahu's west side. Outside Waianae small boat harbor
Level: Beginner to Advanced (great advanced cert training site)
Sea Life: Octopus, Eagle rays, Eels, Reef fish, Turtles…and sometimes Spinner Dolphin.

Located 1/2 mile offshore and a 15-minute boat ride from Waianae Boat Harbor. It is believed that the Mahi was originally built as a minesweeper, but the Navy instead used the 800-ton ship in the Bahamas for laying cable (Video shows cable wheel on the bow).
The wreck was sunk in 1982 and was repositioned 180 degrees by a hurricane.
Sea life surrounds this site making it one of my favorites, especially the school of Porcupine Pufferfish that often surround the center mast. Families of eagle rays make this site their home and are commonly seen cruising above and below us on any given dive.
This video shows the majestic beauty of this dive site.


Click here to watch video (high speed connection)

Click here to watch video (slower speed connections)

 

 

 

KEEP OUR OCEANS BLUE

back to home